Agenda, decisions and minutes

Venue: Council Chamber - County Hall, New Road, Oxford OX1 1ND. View directions

Contact: Deborah Miller  Tel: 07920 084239; E-Mail: deborah.miller@oxfordshire.gov.uk

Items
No. Item

38/19

Minutes pdf icon PDF 146 KB

To approve the minutes of the meeting held on 21 May 2019 (CC1) and to receive information arising from them.

 

Minutes:

The Minutes of the Meeting held on 21 May 2019 were approved and signed subject to the addition of the following text to Minute 32/19.

 

“Councillor Handley expressed his concern that the Joint Fire Consultative Committee had not met within the last 4 years.”

39/19

Apologies for Absence

Minutes:

Apologies for absence were received from Councillor Ted Fenton and Councillor Ian Walker.

40/19

Official Communications

Minutes:

Council paid tribute and held a minutes’ silence in memory of Former County Councillor Wendy Humphries.

 

The Chairman invited Members of the Council to the following events:

 -

Wednesday 10 July 2019 – Buddies at Blenheim;

 

Friday 12 July 2019 – Oxfordshire County Music Service Music Gala Concert, Dorchester Abbey;

 

Friday 19 July 2019 – Charity Golf Event, Bicester Hotel Golf and Spa;

 

The Chairman notified Council that further information and tickets could be sought from Neil Clayton,  P.A to the Chairman.

41/19

Appointments

To make any changes to the membership of the Cabinet, scrutiny and other committees on the nomination of political groups.

Minutes:

RESOLVED: to note the following appointments:

Joint Shared Services and Personnel Committee

 

Councillors Ian Hudspeth, Ted Fenton, Jeannette Matelot, Liz Brighouse and Liz Leffman.

 

 

42/19

Petitions and Public Address

Minutes:

Council received the following Petitions and Public Address:

 

Petitions

 

Ms Zuzana Hrdlickova and Ms Nicola Shorter presented a Petition of 379 Signatures requesting that the Council undertake a review of traffic with a view to improving pedestrian safety and reducing traffic speeds in the Bartholomew and Littlemore Road area.

 

Public Address

 

Mr Adrian Townsend spoke in support of Agenda Item 12 on the basis that he believed the Growth Board had a negative effect on politics and adversely affected the decision making process of both the County and district Councils and that the growth deal was pushing through unwanted, unsustainable  growth in Oxfordshire including the loss of green space and building on greenbelt; providing double the housing actually needed.  He urged the Council to reject the Oxford to Cambridge Expressway and spend the £250 million on the children of Oxfordshire.

 

Ms Jabu Nala-Hartley, Chairman of Living Wage Campaign and Mr Mark Ladbrook, Living Wage Campaign, spoke in support of Agenda Item 14 on the basis that Oxfordshire was an expensive place to live , that many public sector wages remained relatively low; that many local companies had already signed up to supporting the living wage and that those providing public services should be properly compensated.  They urged the Council to support the Motion.

 

43/19

Questions with Notice from Members of the Council pdf icon PDF 321 KB

Minutes:

17 questions with notice were asked. Details of the questions and answers and the supplementary questions and answers (where asked) are set out in Annex 1 to the Minutes.

 

In relation to question 7 (Question from Councillor Bartington to Councillor Constance), Councillor Constance invited all members to apply to be on the Environmental CAG which would be set up in July to look at Environmental issues.

 

In relation to Question 11 (Question from Councillor Buckley to Councillor Lindsay-Gale) Councillor Lindsay-Gale gave an undertaking to provide a written answer to Councillor Buckley detailing how many children with SEN, had had to be accommodated in out of county schools or in private schools within the County within the last 12 months

 

In relation to Question 12 (Question from Councillor Buckley to Councillor Constance) Councillor Constance gave an undertaking that the newly appointed Environmental & Waste Officer would look at reducing the amount of waste exported to Asian countries.

 

In relation to Question 14 (Question from Councillor Pressel to Councillor Constance) Councillor Constance gave an undertaking to ask officers to identify where extra car club spaces could be provided, in consultation with local members.

 

44/19

Senior Joint Leadership Roles pdf icon PDF 424 KB

Since the implementation of the joint working partnership between Oxfordshire County Council and Cherwell District Council a series of senior joint roles have been implemented on a combination of permanent and interim arrangements. These are currently expected to deliver around 600k of savings per annum shared between the two organisations. There is a clear ambition for CDC and OCC to continue to develop the partnership for several reasons:

 

·                To explore the potential of enhanced two tier working to improve the ‘joining up’ of services, improving the experience of service users 

·                To explore the benefits of enhanced two tier working to improve locality working

·                To support the financial sustainability of both organisations (i.e. sharing management roles where appropriate reduces the costs of management overhead)

·                To align and develop approaches to major strategic opportunities such as the growth deal.

·                To align service delivery in areas such as commissioning, housing and social services, to manage demand and improve customer access.

 

The recent Peer Challenge at Oxfordshire County Council made a clear recommendation to stabilise the senior management arrangements by completing the review of the joint working partnership between OCC and CDC. Likewise, CDC needs to clarify and stabilise senior management arrangements as it winds down its joint working arrangements with SNC. The report (TO FOLLOW) recommends approval of two senior officer roles.

 

Minutes:

Council had before it a report (CC9), which outlined joint working between Oxfordshire County Council and Cherwell District Council and sought approval of two senior officer roles.

 

Councillor Hudspeth moved and Councillor Corkin seconded that the recommendations set out in the report and on the face of the Agenda be adopted.

 

Councillor Neville Harris moved and Councillor Stephan Gawrysiak seconded a procedural motion in line with Council Procedure Rule 14.1(iv) that the report be referred to the Audit & Governance Committee for further consideration.

 

Following debate, the motion was put to the vote and was lost by 31 votes to 29.

 

Councillor Brighouse moved and Councillor Fawcett seconded a procedural motion in line with Council Procedure Rule 14.1(vi) to vote separately on recommendations (a) and (b) set out in the report and on the face of the Agenda.

 

The motion was not accepted by the proposer or seconder of the motion and therefore fell.

 

Following debate, the substantive motion was put to the vote and was carried by 31 votes to 30.

45/19

Report of the Cabinet pdf icon PDF 208 KB

Report of the Cabinet Meetings held on 14 May 2019 and 18 June 2019 (CC10).

Minutes:

Council received the report of the Cabinet.

 

In relation to paragraph 5 of the report (Question from Councillor Johnston to Councillor Constance) Councillor Constance gave an assurance that the work on the Oxford Euro 6 Low Emissions Zones for buses would be fed into the Local Transport Plan 5.

 

In relation to paragraph 6 of the report (Question from Councillor Roz Smith to Councillor Constance) Councillor Constance agreed to ensure that the concept of further joint work and passing some of the County’s network team to the city so that the design of temporary road work signage was correct was put on the ‘to do’ list.

 

In relation to paragraph 7 of the report (Question from Councillor Phillips to Councillor Bartholomew) Councillor Bartholomew gave an undertaking to ask the Environmental CAG to look at how the Council’s utility bills could be reduced in all Council Buildings.

46/19

Motion from Councillor Suzanne Bartington

“Recycling delivers multiple environmental and health benefits, including conservation of natural capital, reduction in energy consumption and mitigation of pollutant emissions. The critical role of recycling for sustainable development, is reflected in ambitious targets within the Government 25-Year Environment Plan and Resources and Waste Strategy (Defra, 2018).

 

In 2017/18, Oxfordshire County Council (OCC) was named the best performing county council disposal authority in England for household waste recycling, with an overall rate of over 57%.  This success reflects OCC's commitment to partnership working with the City and District Councils to continuously improve waste services and protect our natural environment.

 

However, performance could be further improved, through coordinated action to identify areas for improvement, disseminate best practice and strive for optimal performance. These efforts would aim to improve overall rates and reduce geographical variation across Oxfordshire: 

 

·                SODC 63%

·                Vale of White Horse 60.4%

·                WODC 59.6%

·                Cherwell 55.6%

·                Oxford City 50.8%

 

This Council calls on the Cabinet Member for Environment to instigate a programme to achieve this goal through four key objectives:

 

(a)          Implement closer partnership working between constituent authorities, sharing best practice and working collaboratively to identify barriers and facilitators for improvement.

(b)          Consider the benefits and any disadvantages of standardisation of collection, waste containers, and quality monitoring.

(c)          Explore measures to minimise the environmental impacts of domestic waste. 

(d)          Encourage public engagement initiatives such as clearer labelling to raise awareness and promote behavioural change among residents.”

 

Minutes:

Councillor Suzanne Bartington Moved and Councillor Nicolas Field-Johnson seconded the following motion:

 

“Recycling delivers multiple environmental and health benefits, including conservation of natural capital, reduction in energy consumption and mitigation of pollutant emissions. The critical role of recycling for sustainable development, is reflected in ambitious targets within the Government 25-Year Environment Plan and Resources and Waste Strategy (Defra, 2018).

 

In 2017/18, Oxfordshire County Council (OCC) was named the best performing county council disposal authority in England for household waste recycling, with an overall rate of over 57%.  This success reflects OCC's commitment to partnership working with the City and District Councils to continuously improve waste services and protect our natural environment.

 

However, performance could be further improved, through coordinated action to identify areas for improvement, disseminate best practice and strive for optimal performance. These efforts would aim to improve overall rates and reduce geographical variation across Oxfordshire: 

 

·                SODC 63%

·                Vale of White Horse 60.4%

·                WODC 59.6%

·                Cherwell 55.6%

·                Oxford City 50.8%

 

This Council calls on the Cabinet Member for Environment to instigate a programme to achieve this goal through four key objectives:

 

(a)          Implement closer partnership working between constituent authorities, sharing best practice and working collaboratively to identify barriers and facilitators for improvement.

(b)     Consider the benefits and any disadvantages of standardisation of collection, waste containers, and quality monitoring.

(c)          Explore measures to minimise the environmental impacts of domestic waste. 

(d)          Encourage public engagement initiatives such as clearer labelling to raise awareness and promote behavioural change among residents.”

 

Councillor Paul Buckley moved and Councillor Roz Smith seconded the following amendment shown in bold italics and strikethrough:

 

“Recycling delivers multiple environmental and health benefits, including conservation of natural capital, reduction in energy consumption and mitigation of pollutant emissions. The critical role of recycling for sustainable development, is reflected in ambitious targets within the Government 25-Year Environment Plan and Resources and Waste Strategy (Defra, 2018).

 

In 2017/18, Oxfordshire County Council (OCC) was named the best performing county council disposal authority in England for household waste recycling, with an overall rate of over 57%.  This success reflects OCC's commitment to partnership working with the City and District Councils to continuously improve waste services and protect our natural environment.

 

However, performance could be further improved, through coordinated action to identify areas for improvement, disseminate best practice and strive for optimal performance. These efforts would aim to improve overall recycling rates especially in the less well performing districts. and reduce geographical variation across Oxfordshire: 

 

·                SODC 63%

·                Vale of White Horse 60.4%

·                WODC 59.6%

·                Cherwell 55.6%

·                Oxford City 50.8%

 

This Council calls on the Cabinet Member for Environment to instigate a programme to achieve this goal through four six key objectives:

 

(a)              Implement closer partnership working between constituent authorities, sharing best practice and working collaboratively to identify barriers and facilitators for improvement.

(b)               Consider the benefits and any disadvantages of standardisation of collection, waste containers, and quality monitoring.

(c)               Explore measures to minimise the environmental impacts of domestic waste. 

 

Following debate, the amendment was put  ...  view the full minutes text for item 46/19

47/19

Motion from Councillor Laura Price

“The Growth Deal is set to bring £215 million to Oxfordshire as part of the agreement with Central Government to deliver homes and infrastructure.

 

There is a risk that many of our residents will not experience the benefit of growth and at worst a fear that there could be a negative impact on our communities.

 

To ensure that future growth in Oxfordshire enhances the lives and outcomes of all our residents, Council calls upon the Leader of the Council to request that the Growth Board create an Inclusive Growth Commission. Comprised of independent experts, the Commission will gather and then consider evidence from across the County and make recommendations that will inform the future approach.”

 

Minutes:

With the consent of Council, Councillor Laura Price moved and Councillor Liz Brighouse seconded the following motion, amended at the suggestion of Councillor Ian Hudspeth as shown in bold italics and strikethrough below:

 

“The Growth Deal is set to bring £215 million to Oxfordshire as part of the agreement with Central Government to deliver homes and infrastructure.

 

There is a risk that many of our residents will not experience the benefit of growth and at worst a fear that there could be a negative impact on our communities.

 

To ensure that future growth in Oxfordshire enhances the lives and outcomes of all our residents, Council calls upon the Leader of the Council to request that the Growth Board create considers creating an Inclusive Growth Commission as part of the current review. Comprised of Comprising independent experts, the Commission will gather and then consider evidence from across the County and make recommendations that will inform the future approach.”

 

Following debate, the motion as amended was put to the vote and was carried unanimously by 58 votes to 0.

 

RESOLVED: (58 votes to 0)

 

The Growth Deal is set to bring £215 million to Oxfordshire as part of the agreement with Central Government to deliver homes and infrastructure.

 

There is a risk that many of our residents will not experience the benefit of growth and at worst a fear that there could be a negative impact on our communities.

 

To ensure that future growth in Oxfordshire enhances the lives and outcomes of all our residents, Council calls upon the Leader of the Council to request that the Growth Board considers creating an Inclusive Growth Commission as part of the current review. Comprising independent experts, the Commission will gather and then consider evidence from across the County and make recommendations that will inform the future approach.

 

48/19

Motion from Councillor Mike Fox-Davies

Many of my Parishes have new housing developments all of which include roads and other infrastructure which will become OCC responsibility to maintain in the future.

 

The position in standard procedures for highways agreements (further to the Highways Act 1980) allows for OCC to take a bond to ensure that associated infrastructure is delivered with all speed and to the standard that allows OCC to adopt the new development roads once the developer has maintained them for a year.

 

At many of these developments, the housing is either fully or almost complete, but there are long lists of unfinished works preventing OCC from adopting the roads and associated infrastructure, many of which have been outstanding for many months or even years. 

 

Taking one example, the housing development has been finished for five years, the developer has banked their profits from the housing sales, but there is a list of over 70 defects (not minor) which are still outstanding.

As the estate has not been adopted, there are many issues which cannot be addressed (such as traffic controls/parking/lighting defects).

 

This Council therefore demands that the Communities Directorate use all legal powers available to ensure that maximum pressure is brought to bear on developers to enable all new developments to be adopted with speed and efficiency.

Minutes:

With the consent of Council, Councillor Fox-Davies moved and Councillor Lynda Atkins seconded the following motion with an minor amendment as follows:

 

“Many of my our Parishes have new housing developments all of which include roads and other infrastructure which will become OCC responsibility to maintain in the future.

 

The position in standard procedures for highways agreements (further to the Highways Act 1980) allows for OCC to take a bond to ensure that associated infrastructure is delivered with all speed and to the standard that allows OCC to adopt the new development roads once the developer has maintained them for a year.

 

At many of these developments, the housing is either fully or almost complete, but there are long lists of unfinished works preventing OCC from adopting the roads and associated infrastructure, many of which have been outstanding for many months or even years. 

 

Taking one example, the housing development has been finished for five years, the developer has banked their profits from the housing sales, but there is a list of over 70 defects (not minor) which are still outstanding.

 

As the estate has not been adopted, there are many issues which cannot be addressed (such as traffic controls/parking/lighting defects).

 

This Council therefore demands that the Communities Directorate use all legal powers available to ensure that maximum pressure is brought to bear on developers to enable all new developments to be adopted with speed and efficiency.”

 

Following debate, the motion as amended was put to the vote and was carried unanimously by 54 votes to 0.

 

RESOLVED: (54 votes to 0)

 

Many of our Parishes have new housing developments all of which include roads and other infrastructure which will become OCC responsibility to maintain in the future.

 

The position in standard procedures for highways agreements (further to the Highways Act 1980) allows for OCC to take a bond to ensure that associated infrastructure is delivered with all speed and to the standard that allows OCC to adopt the new development roads once the developer has maintained them for a year.

 

At many of these developments, the housing is either fully or almost complete, but there are long lists of unfinished works preventing OCC from adopting the roads and associated infrastructure, many of which have been outstanding for many months or even years. 

 

Taking one example, the housing development has been finished for five years, the developer has banked their profits from the housing sales, but there is a list of over 70 defects (not minor) which are still outstanding.

 

As the estate has not been adopted, there are many issues which cannot be addressed (such as traffic controls/parking/lighting defects).

 

This Council therefore demands that the Communities Directorate use all legal powers available to ensure that maximum pressure is brought to bear on developers to enable all new developments to be adopted with speed and efficiency.

 

49/19

Motion From Councillor Deborah McIlveen

“Living costs in Oxfordshire are high and pay is relatively low. High housing costs mean that employers in the public and private sectors struggle to recruit and retain staff.  There are vacancies in all areas of the public sector and this is affecting service delivery. Housing costs in Oxfordshire have risen at a similar rate to those in London where workers in the Public Sector are paid a London Living Wage of £10.55 per hour.

 

Paying a Local Living Wage will enable people to take up job opportunities in Oxfordshire and according to employers would

 

?   improve staff’s quality of work;

?   decrease Absenteeism;

?   with better retention lower human resources costs.

 

It enables people to live on their wages and reduces in work benefits via Universal Credit. Paying the local Living Wage increases investment in the local economy.

 

Oxfordshire County Council asks the Cabinet to set up a working group with health partners and the Oxfordshire System Workforce Group to investigate implementation of a Living Wage in Oxfordshire.”

Minutes:

The time being after 3.30 pm, this motion was considered dropped in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 15.1.